The above two photos go together. The pills still look like the old ones, yet the bottle is the new one. The lot on the bottle is 12H021, Expiration 8 2015. They have not been tried yet by the user..



Above is someone else’s Erfa–they are also the 125 mg, look exactly like the ones above, and the user reports she reacted very badly to this lot. They are 13C06 and expiration is 03/2016. If your expiration is 2016….you may have the new pills. 



Above are two 500-count, 125 mg pill bottles: 
1) the one on the left has an expiration of March 2013. The pill on the left came from it. It’s lot number is 10C26. It’s definitely the old Erfa that worked. 
2) The bottle on the right was purchased in January 2014 and has an expiration of August 2015. It’s lot number is 12H021. Notice the pills look pretty similar…but the bottle on the right has the green bar. The pills in the bottle on the right haven’t been tried yet.  It looks like they are the old pills, and the 2015 expiration also implies it. 



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Old bottle on the left (purchased Jan 2013; expires November 2015), is lot #12K16.
Bottle on right (purchased April 2014; expires October 2016) has lot #LF03139B.

Notice the different lettering of ERFA on both bottles as compared to the bottles above this, under EXAMPLE PHOTOS #3. That means you can’t necessary TELL if you have the new pills by the bottle design.

But note that the pill on the right, from the newest purchased bottle, has deeper indentations. New pill?? We think so. It’s got flecks that the old pill doesn’t have, has deeper indentations, and has an expiration of 2016….all which seem to fit the pills that have caused a return of symptoms in many individuals.