LicoriceLicorice Root has been around as an herbal health aid for thousands of years in a variety of cultures, including Asia, Europe and even ancient Egypt. It is said that King Tut’s tomb contained large amount of licorice for his afterlife pleasure.

Even today, the Chinese value licorice to stabilize other flavors in their foods, and as an herb, to promote better energy and wellness.

How does licorice root benefit thyroid patients with slightly low cortisol? If saliva cortisol results prove slightly low cortisol, licorice root, especially with the key ingredient glycyrrhizin, may have possible benefit. It is said to:

  1. extend the life of the cortisol you do have by slowing down its breakdown to cortisone, and thus, making it more effective.
  2. activate the aldosterone receptors.

Can I just eat the candy licorice and get the same benefit?

It needs to be the herb “licorice root” rather than candy, and which can be found in capsules, tablets, and liquid extracts. You can even get “licorice root” teas.

How much do I use?

Patients go by the directions on the bottle first to see if that’s enough to see improvement.

How long can I use it? 

It’s mostly recommended not to go longer than 4-6 weeks, then take a two week break.

Side effects?

Some patients have experienced a rise in blood pressure with its use, so it’s recommended to regularly check blood pressure. Other side effects could include increased fluid retention, headaches, anxiety. Keeping an eye on potassium levels may be wise, since licorice root is known to lower it, which can explain blood pressure problems. Licorice root not recommended if you already have high blood pressure or heart disease, or are pregnant.

I found a licorice root product that says DGL. What is that?

DGL stands for ”deglycyrrhizinated licorice” and means the most important ingredient for the above positive effect has been removed—glycyrrhizin. That’s not the kind of licorice root which will help extend the life of cortisol. :(

Can I use it if I have severe low cortisol? 

Possibly not a good idea, as some have reported over-stimulation.