Question: What do most doctors & lemon cars have in common?

Answer: Most are duds.

On Monday, I had an enjoyable experience with an exception to the lemon cliche:  I was a guest on Dr. Steven F. Hotze’s radio program Health and Wellness Solutions, broadcast live from Houston, Texas.  You can listen to a recording of our conversation here on the lower right under the heading Dr. Hotze Radio in orange.

The commercials were like flies, zeroing in often and irritatingly. But we managed to briefly mention both Stop the Thyroid Madness as well as the Hotze Health & Wellness Center.

And two things struck me about our friendly chat: first, Hotze mentioned that he started prescribing natural desiccated thyroid in the 1990’s, far ahead of most doctors even today!  If only we knew.  And second, he made a quick mention of how disappointing most doctors are for patients, referring to the STTM page called Give Me A Break. If you haven’t seen it, or it’s been awhile, you will find it both hilarious and completely sad.

And it all made me ponder how in 2010, eight years after I personally found the life changing desiccated thyroid,  there are still so many family practitioners and Endocrinologists keeping thyroid patients sick all over the world, even if they mean well, even if they are good people, even if they do other diagnoses and treatments correctly.

So on one hand, it’s reality that progress is slow. But on the other hand, the thyroid treatment wall of ignorance is slowly tumbling down about better thyroid treatment thanks to patients who read about it and carry that information into their doctors offices.

So perhaps over time, the lemons who practice bad thyroid treatment will become less and less prominent in the name of enlightenment, wisdom and LISTENING to patients.

P.S. And by way, if you are lucky enough to have found one of those docs who prescribe desiccated thyroid, remember that NO doctor is all-knowing. YOU live in your own body, and can have your OWN wisdom and knowledge. So expect the relationship be a partnership. And if you can’t get that partnership, find a better doctor.

Want to read more about natural desiccated thyroid? Go here.   To read my own story, go here.

7 Responses to “Question: What do most doctors & lemon cars have in common?”

  1. ostbey

    Dear Janie,
    I can’t seem to find the recording you referred to.
    On the page you mentioned, under “Dr. Hotze Radio”, there is one link “LISTEN” under the icon of a loudspeaker, with the text “Listen to our Wellness Experts on Health and Wellness Solutions 12:00-1:00pm CST.” to its right.
    Did you mean that?
    It seems to be today’s broadcast, though, not yesterday’s!
    Or did you mean one of the three links below that one?
    # Janice’s Hypothyroidism Succ…
    # Dr. Hotze & Dr. Erika Sc…
    # Birth Control Pills vs. Bioi…
    Thank you for any hints and pointers!

    From Janie: it may take a day or two to appear. 🙁

    Reply
  2. Theresa Roberts

    Ha Ha!

    I listened as much as I could to yesterday’s broadcast (even tuned it in for my boss, who’s also my husband!). It was nice to hear from a doctor who understands what we patients go through. I wish there were more like him. I heard of a doctor here in New Brunswick, Canada who is great with bio-identical hormones, and I’m waiting to hear from his receptionist what his stand on cortisol supplementation and adrenal support is. It would be worth a little drive to talk to someone who gets it. Also, he only takes walk-ins, and I already have a family doctor who is not very interested in hormones (even thyroid hormones), so I hope this guy can help me. My saliva test indicated a sharp drop from morning to noon in my cortisol levels, and a further drop in afternoon and evening. This may be why I still suffer hypo symptoms with a tsh of 0.04 (I take 240 mg of desiccated thyroid daily, divided into 4 doses of 60 mg each)!

    Reply
  3. Kristen Klutes

    Dear Janie,
    Unfortunately, I missed your broadcast.
    Excuse me if I sound “new at this” but I’m hoping you can help me-My 11yo daughter was diagnosed last August 2009 with Early Thyroid Failure and I was told her anitibodies were positive (as far as I know, there is no hx of thyroid problems on either side of the family). She was immediately prescribed Synthroid, 50 mcg/day. The Pediatric Endocrinologist did a follow up blood test and raised her Synthroid to 56 mcg/day sometime in early December. Since September/October 2009, she has complained of nausea and an inability to eat in the morning. She also continues to have issues with constipation. I told her Pediatrician and Endocrinologist and they ordered a bunch of tests-all came back normal except for a low IgA level. The Doctors have basically done nothing about the nausea issue since all the “tests” came back normal-her Endocrinologist says the Synthroid medication typically does not cause these symptoms so it must be something else. I’m wondering if the inactive ingredients in the Synthroid or the dye color used in the making of the med are causing her nausea. She is obviously still growing, Is Armour safe for kids? Can you recommend a decent guide book or web site specific for kids with Hashimoto’s? We live close to Minneapolis MN-can you recommend a good doctor? I’m at my wits end! I want her to feel better! Thanks, so much, for any help!

    Kristen

    Reply
  4. Stephanie Nguyen

    I cannot for the life of me find the interview on Dr. Hotze’s website. Do you have a direct link to it? I’ve searched through the archives and can’t find it.

    Thanks,
    Steph

    (From Janie: Sadly, it appears they don’t have it up even yet. I’ll bug him about it.)

    Reply
  5. Crystal Conner

    I was diagnosed with Hypothyroid when I was in my 20’s. I was prescribed Synthroid and various other types of thyroid medications, I had allergic type reactions to all of them. The Dr. I was seeing, at the time they found out I had a parathyroid tumor, said to me “you have to take your thyroid medication or you will die. We don’t understand why you are not in a coma, your TSH level is over 70” After my husband told her “What don’t you understand about (SHE CAN’T TAKE IT!!)?” the Dr went back East to some seminar and found out I was (at that time) one of only about 100 thousand people in the US that had a rare reaction to the medication. My body was reacting to the medication like it would an infection or the flu (that was how she described it to us). The Dr. had to start me off on 1/8th of a baby dose of thyroid medication with valium to keep me calm (part of my reaction to the thyroid medication was feeling like I was crawling out of my skin and anger outbursts).
    Always get copies of your test results too and keep track of all changes.
    I am just now learning about the T3 thing myself and I have had thyroid problems for over 25 years. God bless my cousin for telling me about this site and other medical info.

    Reply
  6. irene

    I have graves/hyperthyroid. Also pituitary microadenoma and dysfunction history. My sugars won’t stop dropping fast. you talk about low thyroid . do you have any info /websites/etc. that could help me?

    (From Janie: Irene, I would suggest using a good search engine like google and see what you can find. I’m not educated on your condition.)

    Reply
  7. ostbey

    Dear Janie,
    there still is nothing there!
    Or did I miss it somewhere?
    Thanks for any enlightenment!
    Cheers!

    From Janie: They first said it would be up within the first week. Nothing. I then have asked them twice to get it up, to no avail. I have no idea. 🙁

    Reply

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