Dr. Lowe wants to talk to you more directly this Thursday–post your questions here!

Dr.JohnCLowe

Please note: Dr. Lowe is NOT an MD or DO who see’s patients and can prescribe. He’s a thyroid and fibro “researcher” with good knowledge about T3,  fibro, metabolism, supplements etc. Many questions have been coming in which are already answered on STTM, or are more targeted to a practicing physician, not a researcher. FYI.
🙂
1-14-08: COMMENTS with your QUESTIONS ARE NOW CLOSED TO POSTING.  There are more than he can answer right now. See you tonite!

On the heels of an informative and wonderful THYROID PATIENT COMMUNITY CALL on Talkshoe last week with Dr. John C. Lowe (see posts below), we’re going to do it again this coming Thursday, January 14th.  Join us for Part 2!

Dr. Lowe is a fibromyalgia, thyroid, and metabolism researcher who has always been such a champion for better diagnosis and treatment in thyroid patients. He is Editor-in-Chief of the open access journal www.thyroidscience.com as well as his own www.drlowe.com

And this time, Dr. Lowe is going to spend more time answering  your specific questions. Check out his websites above to get an idea what his expertise is, which includes the use of T3,  Hashimotos autoimmune thyroid disease, iodine, fibromyalgia, the tyranny of the TSH lab test, good supplements, the FDA, and more.

So here’s your chance: think of one or two questions you’d like to hear him answer. Please, if you have more more than two,  narrow them down to the two most important, and keep them brief.  No exceptions. Two max only, and brief.  Then use the Comments below to post them.  Be sure and check out if your questions have already been asked in other comments.

I’ll be collecting the questions ahead of time and will let him preview them. He wants to give you his best.

TIPS ABOUT TALKSHOE: Some reported being booted off and having to quickly rejoin. One step that may help is to download the Talk Shoe Live Pro ahead of time (takes 25 minutes for some) and use that software during the call, since it gives you far more stability.  Also, make SURE you have everything else closed and/or not running on your computer at the same time you are in the Talkshoe call. I will also be chatting with Talkshoe support and will get more ideas.

Also, don’t wait until the call occurs to mention your question. We found it difficult to try collecting them on the Chat. Ask now!!

Yes, you can also call in live during the Call, but it’s good to first let me know your question here.

And finally, at a certain point of those who join (after 300 on chat), Talkshoe participants are automatically unable to post on the chat. You can listen, but no chatting. So if you want to chat, join as soon as the Call opens up, which is 15 minutes before the actual audio begins. Times for the audio are 9 pm Eastern, 8 pm Central, 7 Mountain, and 6 pm Pacific.

The Stop the Thyroid Madness Talkshoe page: http://www.talkshoe.com/talkshoe/web/talkCast.jsp?masterId=62603&cmd=tc

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See the blog post below those about Lowe for a very insightful Guest Blog Post by Amy about her role as an Undercover Thyroid Advocate. Below that, you can read how I was wrong about what it was like to be thyroidless, and several great comments.

62 Responses to “Dr. Lowe wants to talk to you more directly this Thursday–post your questions here!”

  1. No'a Winter Lazerus

    Question 1 – What are some of the diverse problems with T4 therapy and does he prefer Desiccated thyroid for most patients.

    Question 2 – What does he feel is the best treatment for the auto-immune disease aspect of Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis beyond just thyroid therapy as most allopathic doctors do not have any solution to the other problems with the auto-immune aspect of that illness.

    Thank you

    No’a

    Reply
  2. Victoria

    When a patient’s OAT (ovarian, adrenal, thyroid) axis is messed up, how do you know which system to treat first? Or do you treat all three at the same time? Can treatments “cancel one another out?”

    Reply
  3. Venizia

    Is it ok to stay on T3 (cytomel) only, for the rest of my life? What do we say to doctors to convince them it is ok?

    Reply
  4. Amy M

    1. What is your take on long-term T3-only therapy, there are many who are not taking any T4 at all and find they can’t transistion back over to T4 meds.

    2. Do you think it’s possible to design a good head-to-head study comparing desiccated thyroid and synthetic T4?

    Reply
  5. Paulette

    I would like to ask Dr. Lowe two questions:

    1. What do I do if I keep increasing my thyroid and added some cortisone, but still am losing hair and my temps are low, but all my labs show hyperthyroidism (TSH undetectable and above normal range free T3) and also am having some hyper symptoms (shakiness, nervousness, fast heart rate)?

    2. Several doctors have strongly advised me to stop taking so much thyroid as my TSH is undetectable, stating that it would cause osteoporosis. I am very small boned and this is a great concern to me.

    Reply
  6. Jan

    Thank you Janie and Dr.Lowe
    I am on T3 only (generic Cynomel) and have been for 9 weeks now. I am up to 200mcg daily (in split doses), but I have no real improvement of symptoms yet. My adrenals are stable, so my questions are…

    1.Why am I not showing an improvement of symptoms yet(still very hypo)?
    2.Am I missing something?

    My symptoms include, low temps, hair falling out, consistent weight gain, fatigue, and so on.

    I take vitamin/mineral supplements also including B vitamins, zinc, selenium, iodine.

    Reply
  7. CindyCB

    My questions are:

    1) Would you say adrenal and thyroid glandular extracts have sufficient hormones in them to be of use?

    2)Exactly how does low cortisol block your thyroid hormone receptors?

    Thank you 🙂

    Reply
  8. Tasia

    Can someone with RT3 issues use natural desiccated thyroid successfully? I’ve had better results with desiccated thyroid than with Cytomel despite my high RT3 issue w/ natural thyroid.

    Reply
  9. Liz R.

    1)Has he heard of swollen glands in the necks associated with hypo w/ or with Hashi’s and a 7mm nodule that hasn’t changed size in a year?
    2)If hypothyroidism is predominantly a female disease, why isn’t more research done with it conjunction with female sex hormones?

    Reply
  10. Anna Maria Bjornsdotter

    Question 1. Can antidepressants, like mirtazapine, interfere with thyroid hormone production?

    Question 2. Is it possible that the weight gain, drowsiness and cognitive impairment many people experience when being medicated with antidepressants are due to repressed thyroid hormones?

    Thank you very much!
    Maria

    Reply
  11. Lindsey

    1) Have you ever put a patient on compounded T3/T4 and still remain to have hypo symptoms even after several dosage raises?
    2) Is there any difference between generic and brand name Synthroid and can they make a difference in how a patient feels?

    Reply
  12. Regina

    1) Can’t lose weight, even on 800 calories. Am on 2 grain Erfa TSH 0.039, Free T4 8.3 (middle of range), Free T3 4.9 (outside upper range). Am not hyper. Doc wants to add 10 mcg T4 and possibly cortisol (Cortisol back in circadian rhythm, but low in the pm).

    2) Could not losing weight be related to mal-absorption? I don’t feel or look mal-nourished. Plenty of good supplements and healthy foods.

    Reply
  13. Shirley

    Is there truly a connection between hypothyroidism, (Hashimoto’s specifically), and psoriasis. If so, is there any successful treatment?

    Reply
  14. Abigail

    Just one question and this will answer all ten quesions I have: Can you provide me with a referral to a doc in NY? (I have fibromyalgia a few years and no end in sight. I am thyroidless as of a few months ago and unable to find a doc to help me with my thyroid resistance problem.)
    If I lived anywhere near Dr. Lowe I’d be there 🙂 but right now will do with a referral to a NY doc.

    Reply
  15. Heather

    1) What is the best treatment for Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis while pregnant?

    2) How harmful is it to the unborn baby if I haven’t been on any treatment for Hashi’s for the first 10 weeks of pregnancy?

    Reply
  16. Alice

    1) What is your position on using Iodine Supplements for patients with Hashimoto’s? Dr. Brownstein makes a good argument for using it while Dr. Khazarrian gives reasons why it could cause a autoimmune attack.

    2) Dr. Khazarrian in his book points out that if Hashimoto’s antibodies can be suppressed by addressing the triggers that cause them, patients may not even need thyroid meds. Do you have any experience with this?

    Reply
  17. LindaD

    To add to Venezia’s question: Is it okay for a thyroidless individual to stay on T3 only for life?

    Reply
  18. Karen

    Can taking t3, through increased production of SHBG, lead to an estrogen deficiency in the body? If so is there any way to add estrogen without de-activating the positive effects of the thyroid med?

    Reply
  19. Deanna

    Finally have my thyroid under control with levoxyl and compounded time release t-3. I just got put on Isocort for adrenal issues and up to 8 per day. When should i see some improvement? Still swollen, unable to lose the weight,and waking up at night.

    Reply
  20. Vivien

    Is there still huge back orders on Nature-Throid medicine. My insurance says I have to get my prescriptions thru CVS pharmacies. CVS doesn’t have it and says it has been backordered thru their supplier since August! and have no clue when or if they will get it in stock.

    What’s a Natural form of thyroid medicine that’s alternative for Nature-Throid?

    (From Janie: that’s answered right here: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/options-for-thyroid-treatment)

    Reply
  21. Jennifer

    Just a general request here–for those of us who will not be able to join in this R, can a transcript of the conversation be made or recording be archived of this session? Thanks!

    (From Janie: Recordings are always there. 🙂 Just check the same link.)

    Reply
  22. Liz

    I have recently been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s at age 25, although I have had hypo symptoms since I was a child. I understand that natural thyroid is the best option, but for someone in my case would it be best to start on only Cytomel because of reverse T3.

    Reply
  23. Liz

    Do you believe PCOS is ultimately caused by hypothyroidism? If so, are there many fertility sucess stories once placed on direct t3?

    Reply
  24. Lindsey

    I can’t afford the adrenal saliva kit; how do I get my doctor to treat me with HC?

    Reply
  25. Emma

    Does Dr Lowe have a preferred method of measuring metabolism – e.g. body temp, metabolic chamber? Do these correlate more accurately with patients’ symptoms than TSH/T4/T3? I’d like to know whether symptom intensity relates directly to metabolic level rather than hormone levels, and whether there are other hormonal/nutritional factors that help to determine the speed of metabolism?

    How is liver/kidney function affected by hypothyroidism? I had many non-immune food intolerances (e.g. to wine, spicy foods, cheese) when I was hypo, that are now gone. This seems to be a mysterious subject area.

    Also, as someone who was diagnosed with fibromyalgia at age 13, only to have all my symptoms vanish 20 years later, after being diagnosed hypothyroid, I’m fascinated by Dr Lowe’s description of the critical events that led to the usage of TSH/T4 tests, and how the diagnosis of fibromyalgia came into existence, and I’d like to hear more on this subject.

    Thanks!

    Reply
  26. Barb

    1. If there’s only a weak correlation of FT3 with your metabolism, how does he determine optimum thyroid dose?

    2. What does he think causes rT3, and has he ever corrected it so the patient could return to NDT?

    Reply
  27. mary

    1) I am an 18 year-thyroid cancer survivor who has decided not to continue going through the 5 year RAI total body scan testing, I’m worried that drinking the toxic cocktail could eventually cause me more harm. your thoughts?
    2) With no thyroid, is it beneficial to take iodine or can the body not absorb it? I do take it.
    note: I was on Synthroid for 16 years. Felt horrible & fought with Endocrinologist. I now have a D.O. and taking Armour & feel much better, though with the shortage it is impossible to get.

    Reply
  28. L. Morgan

    Hi,
    Thank God for STTM in helping us to navigate through all of this crazy, Thyroid stuff. Any suggestions on how we, as a group, can help in getting the info out to doctors that T4 meds are not for everyone? As you know, many patients, including myself, are not receiving adequate treatment by our doctors. There should come a time where we don’t have to SEARCH for a doctor in order to get proper treatment. All doctors should be educated based on your findings, for example. In additon, changes need to be made based on patients’ stories and accounts. Can you suggest ways in which we can be heard by the medical profession and hopefully help to transform the way in which Endocrinologists treat thyroid disease/disorders? What do you think would be the best methods in the quest to reform the practices of Endocrinologists?. Do we contact the AMA or other organizations? Any ideas? I just believe that until we help change the way doctors are educated about thyroid disease, we’ll continue to have major problems in the way they treat us as patients.

    Thank you for your time

    Reply
  29. Debbie Fox

    1. How does alpha delta wave intrusion play into fibro, and is it remedied through thyroid/adrenal balance.

    2. How do you test for adrenal fatigue ie: blood, saliva or urine; and should they not all correlate w/each other?

    Reply
  30. Regina C

    I started Iodine supp. 2 months ago and hypo symptoms (non-Hashimoto) have improved greatly. Do you have any suggestions on the best strategy to increase iodine and eventually decrease synthroid to zero?

    Reply
  31. Miryum

    Are ‘psychiatric disorders’ rooted in metabolic dysregulation and if yes do you believe that ‘Post Traumatic Stress Disorder’ is driven by the same metabolic dysregulatiion?

    What is the greatest length of time it has taken for your patients to go from being dependent on ‘psychiatric drugs’ to living really well without it, due to your treatment? About how many successes do you see per week/month?

    Thank you very much!

    Reply
  32. Shelley

    1. Is there sometype of reference sheet for blood tests that shows what is the ideal?
    2. RLC labs carries a Thyroid supplement called ‘Hypo Support Formula’. Do you have any experience with recommending this product to person who has Hashimoto’s.

    Reply
  33. Jennifer Quiroz

    What I would like to know is if properly medicated, can a person with hypothyroidism ever be the person they were before or will one always have to struggle with sickness and physical problems the rest of their lives and would there ever be the possibility that one’s thyroid could heal and no medication be needed?

    Thanks,
    JQ

    Reply
  34. katie a

    I am confused about Iodine for patients like myself with Hashimoto’s. I have been tested and have very low iodine, but if I take supplements I get sick.
    However, I have found that when I eat shellfish, I feel much better–I have more clarity and my muscles do not fatigue as much. I also find that sometimes I can tolerate kelp, but after a few days I start getting auto immune symptoms again and just feel awful I would love some guidance and information on this issue.

    Reply
  35. denise

    Hi
    1. Me and my son age 14 have hashimoto,s thyroidosis we are both hypo does is this run in family and what are the chances of it passing onto his children my eldest son has been tested for thyroid and it is ok for now.

    2. on the morning of blood tests i dont take my tablets till after my bloods have been taken as i was told if you take them before this can give a false reading is this right.

    Reply
  36. ghazaleh

    I have recently been diagnosed with Hashimoto,s,although for almost 10 years i am suffering from acute fatigue, mental fogginess and poor memory. I am a phD student of Engineering and could you imagine how dificult it is to handle this programe? I take 0.05mg/d Levothyroxine ,however, no improvement has gained. I am going to give up phD,its a stressful prgramme and my body cant tolerate huge stress and fatigue. Because of poor memory i am not successful in my studying,can not attend any discussion . PLease give me any recommendation how to improve phyiscally, mentally and emotionally. my emotion changes every hours. I am tired of this situation while i am always worried for my future . please please please help me. my life is totaly full of mess.

    Reply
  37. Sandra

    Hello!!
    Many many hugs to Janie, Darla, Sam for all you do and to all the other team who are literally saving our lives!!.

    Ok to keep it short.

    I am hypo, cancer in 94 no thyroid, health declining 5-7 years now and am still on Levothyroxin. Seen 6 naturopaths and no one has suggested natural thyroid and now that I know what I know thanks to STTM I am getting it on my next appt. (hopefully)
    My question 1) is it best to wait until I am no longer hypo and feeling good on natural thyroid before I do any heavy metal detoxing/chelation or cleanses? In the past when I did try I just got too sick to continue so I gave up.
    2) If I’m hypo what amount of iodine is safe to take to benefit me and should I make sure my adrenals are good first before taking.
    Many thanks for considering my questions!

    Reply
  38. Joann

    Do you have an opinion or have any experience utilizing Low Dose Naltrexone for autoimmune thyroid disorders?

    Reply
  39. Anna Sofia

    I have been on Synthroid for 20 years (125 mcg) after a goiteroperation where they removed a big part of my thyroid. I have been unable to work for the last 8 years due to what I now understand are hyposymtoms but have alwways been told it was psychiatric. I started on T3 in september and are now on 40mcg and take cortison for my adrenals. Am having a bit more energy but expected a bigger improvement. Could this be due to thyroid hormone resistance, how can I tell and what are the treatment and tests for this? ( I am hoping and trying to get at prescription for Dessicated Thyroid soon!)THANK YOU!

    Reply
  40. Rachel

    1. For adrenal fatigue/hypothyroidism, what do you recommend doctors/patients use to determine whether or not the patient is adequately treated? For instance, do you recommend using FT3/RT3 ratio, temperatures, clinical presentation (symptoms), or ? as good indicators in how the thyroid meds are being used at the cellular level?
    2. Have you seen asthma and or skin problems such as excema improve with thyroid hormone treatment?

    Reply
  41. Bev Cousineau

    My last saliva test for cortisol was very poor [8am 3, noon less than one, 5pm 1, midnight less than one]. I had taken a break from Isocort to take this test and had been doing well on 3 tabs daily. I then started on HC because of my concern re the herbs in Isocort as I found I am salicylate sensitive. I had continual weight gain on the HC and no improvement so I have gone back on the Isocort. My doctor had never seen such a weight gain. Why would the HC cause weight gain?

    Reply
  42. shira

    I have been on synthroid a few months then switched to cytomel-only treatment. On both treatments my blood levels of free t3 remained low, despite being on adequate doses (125 mcg.) I consistently have symptoms of hyper-stimulation (as per your written work) and low levels of free t3. I’ve been on hydrocortisone to support my adrenals just in case it was low cortisol that was preventing t3 from reaching the cellular level; however, my free t3 continues to remain low. I’ve had to reduce my thyroid hormone dose to negligible amounts which leaves me with hypothyroid symptoms. I have also been supplementing with iron believing low ferritin was a contributor, but to no avail. What do you think is preventing the t3 from reaching the cellular level?

    With much appreciation for taking the time to help us!

    Reply
  43. L. Morgan

    Hello, Dr. Lowe:

    1) Can you please suggest some comprehensive, accurate resources for Grave’s Disease?

    2) Being post RAI, I am interested in your views about foods to avoid and supplements that I need to take and anything else that might make life better. (I tried fish oil but then realized I probably don’t need the iodine; Is it okay in small amounts or best to avoid all together)?

    Also, I wanted to suggest to those who have had Hyperthyroidism due to G.D. or due to another origin–please get a bone density test. None of my doctors suggested it. Thankfully, I had a routine screening through a drugstore that alerted me to a problem. A formal bone density test revealed that I have Osteopenia.

    None of my Endos or other doctors have offered any help/suggestions regarding my GD. And when I ask quesitons about GD in relation to my thyroid issues and other physical ailments, I get hardly anything in terms of info. They have never even mentioned the potential eye inflammation that could occur as a patient with GD.

    I’ve found a few resources(i.e. books, sites) that discuss Grave’s Disease. But, I would love to know if you can suggest some more.

    Thanks so much,
    L. Morgan

    Reply
  44. Sky

    On behalf of my dad what is the best way to treat fibromyalgia and hashimotos.

    Do you believe in reverse t3?

    Reply
  45. Cheryl M.

    1) I am concerned about the potential for prion contaminants in dessicated thyroid.

    2) It is my understanding that pharmaceutical-grade thyroid products (Unithroid, Synthroid,…)are “bioidentical”. What is the difference between treating with Armour vs. synthetic T4 and adding T3 as needed or a T4/T3 combo?

    Reply
  46. Starrie

    1) I need recommendations for SAFELY starting to take Isocort. I don’t want to risk a thyroid dump etc.

    2) I am also having trouble finding a doctor who is willing to guide me through this process. Any recommendations would be appreciated.

    Reply
  47. Kate

    Dear Dr Lowe (you rock!),

    I was hospitalised in a state of ‘hypomania’ and diagnosed with bipolar disorder way back in 2001. 6 months later I experienced another MAJOR depression (the worst of 3) despite being on a high dose of sodium valproate and risperidone. Not long after that lithium was added to the mix which helped lift the depression and I was slowly weaned off the sodium valproate. A month or so later I was diagnosed by an endocrinologist with hypothyroidism when nearly ALL my hair fell out (I’m talking ‘comb over’ material) and I had already gained 25kg. I remember being told I had probably had hypothyroidism since I was 15 (in 1994). I also remember my endocrinologist saying at the time that my antibodies looked ok so I didn’t have ‘hashi’s’.

    I have been taking lithium and Oroxine and have been in remission from bipolar mood swings ever since despite lingering thyroid and adrenal symptoms, which I always thought were related to bipolar disorder and lithium therapy until now. These symptoms have been getting worse and worse since about 2005 despite always having normal TSH T4 test results since starting Oroxine in 2002. No one has tested me for antibodies since because my TSH T4 test has always been ‘normal’ and no one will do it now (not yet anyway) because my TSH T4 test is ‘normal’!

    So here are my questions for you:

    1) Is it possible that Hashimoto’s can cause symptoms of bipolar disorder that can result a misdiagnosis of bipolar disorder?

    2) It is possible that I may have had ‘normal’ levels of antibodies at the time I was tested (I still don’t know if both antibodies were ever tested) and still have had Hashimoto’s as the cause of my original bipolar symptoms?

    Thank you for you help 🙂

    Reply
  48. Bonnie Lefrak

    Dear Dr. Lowe:

    Thank you for your great work and all your help.
    TWO Questions-

    1. If using T3 only- will Iodoral cause the body to make T4, or enough T4 to negate all the progress of clearing exccessive RT3?

    2. Are there any issues with fertility and or maintaining a pregnancy on T3 only? Will clearing RT3 and using T3 perhaps reset regular menstrual cycyles/ovulation?

    Thank you Janie and the members of STTM!!!

    Reply
  49. Marie

    Do you recommend Naturethroid over Erfa for patients in the USA? Are Naturethroid patients feeling as well on the new Naturethroid formula as they were feeling on Erfa?

    Reply
  50. Lynn Dunning

    To Regina:

    Have you been screened for Celiac disease? I could not lose weight until even trace amounts of gluten were gone from my diet. I am a low carber so ate little gluten anyway, but even a trace is enough to do damage to a Celiac. Blood tests do not rule OUT Celiac; they can only rule it in. So, if bloods are negative, the next step is an enterolab test. Only after an enterolab test can one say they definitely do NOT have Celiac disease.

    Also, you may be a person that hyperconverts T4 to T3 on their way to an optimal dose as I did: http://forums.realthyroidhelp.com/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=16314

    Reply
  51. Carol

    Q-1: Can Dr. Lowe elaborate more on his experiences with myofascial triggger-points and hypothyroid connection? For me, this is the most stubborn of all my hypo symptoms… gets worse the more hypo I am and treatments provide only temporary relief.

    Q-2: Doctors seem to automatically consider palpitations a symptom of over-medication, but can they be a hypo symptom as well? I have experienced palpitations on the new Armour but not on Nature-throid so I’m wondering if the palps are most likely indicative of needing more or less medication (i.e. Armour since that’s the only med I have access to at the moment).

    Reply
  52. Jennifer McCalla

    1)I am still trying hard to find a Doc in my area that is willing to treat my thyroid that is ‘normal’ according to my bloodwork. I am also terrified that my daughter may have the same issues. She is starting out with headaches & low temp. at age 5 &1/2. When is a good time to get her chked out? Or should I wait till she’s a little bit older to worry about her having hypo? I don’t want her to suffer as long as I have!
    2)How do you know if you have hypothyroidism or a problem with your hormones/estradiol?

    Reply
  53. Jan

    Question one: I have been on dessicated thyroid for two years. I have an RT3 problem that worsened with Hydrocortisone therapy. I have low ferritin and trouble tolerating any significant iron supplementation. Should I be on T3 anyway while I work on raising ferritin? Currently taking 25mg of HC and 1/2 grain of NatureThroid.

    Reply
  54. Debbie R.

    Dr. Lowe,

    I have read on your website that you recommend a once daily dose of T3 for those on T3-only therapy. But on STTM and the RT3 discussion group, I’ve read recommendations to multidose. I began by multidosing but have begun working toward trying to dose once daily. So far I’ve been pleased, but am concerned that I will have difficulty functioning in the a.m. without a nighttime dose (one of my worst symptoms is chronic urticaria that responds directly to T3 — so it is worse in the morning until the T3 builds throughout the day). Right now I’m taking 4 25mcg cynomel upon rising, 1 25mcg around 11 am, and 1 at bedtime. Could you elaborate on your arguments for a single dose and why the arguments for multidosing might or might not have validity? Thanks so much.

    Reply
  55. Susan

    For the menopausal woman; please address the complexities of bioidentical hormone replacement (using estradiol and progesterone), high cortisol, (chronic insomnia) and Hashimoto’s.

    What else can be taken for chronic insomnia (high cortisol levels, unbalanced estrogen/progesterone, hashimoto’s) besides PS (phosphatidylserine) or Seriphos, which is non addictive?

    Reply
  56. Debbie R.

    Dr. Lowe,

    Do you have any experience with pregnant moms on T3 only therapy? Could there be any risks to the baby from the absence of T4 or calcitonin intake for the mom?

    Also, any advice about how to decide whether to stay on T3 therapy for life if doing well or to try switching back to NDT or a T3/NDT combination after effectively clearing out a huge overabundance of RT3?

    Reply
  57. DeAnna

    Dr. Lowe,
    I have contacted your office and wife at one time. I also live in The Woodlands. You had mentioned you do not treat patients, but you do communicate with PCP’s to treat patients in conjunction. If this is what you recommend – Can you recommend a doctor that will work with you in The Woodlands/Houston or even National (I would travel) for a Thyroidless person??? I am recently married and understand my body is so messed up I do not think I will be able to conceive a child. I am also an RN and extremely frustrated with my DO and Internist. I do not believe the TSH is a value to follow with me as I clearly do not have a PITUITARY ISSUE. I have dealt with this my entire life. Both my mother & MGM had Thyroid Cancer with Partial/RAI. I’m currently on Sythroid since the reformulation of Armour and lack of NT.

    Thank you – Thyroidless since 2 years old and tired,
    DeAnna

    Reply
  58. Laura

    Dr. Lowe, I have been told I am a difficult case. Main complaint is chronic, all-over muscle (I mean every muscle!) fatigue/soreness, fatigue (mostly in the evening) and scalp soreness. Normal thyroid labs (low-normal FT4/FT3 and RT3 a bit elevated) and unable to dose up on “any” thyroid medication. Have tried low doses of all thyroid meds (Armour, Levoxyl, Levoxyl & Cytomel combo) with no improvement and unable to dose up due to heart palps. and irritability. Normal cortisol, normal vitamin panel, except receive periodic iron infusions due to heavy periods and am below normal magnesium but supplement with upper limit doses with no muscle improvement. No muscle disease, no lyme disease, no arthritis, no antibodies, no food intolerances, etc. Everything always comes back normal. Also take high-quality vitamins and supplement with bio-identical progesterone. None of this seems to help. Fortunately, my doctor is willing to test for anything and try anything. Any advice would be much appreciated. Laura

    Reply
  59. Kathy M

    Since there are thousands of us in the NTH groups….would it be possible for Dr. Lowe to use us as part of his research?

    Reply
  60. Linda

    I have a question rather than a comment. I know that dessicated thyroid comes from a pig’s thyroid and it is supposedly better than synthetic hormone – but how is it acquired? Do they kill the pig? I like pigs. They are very intelligent animals and the thought that they kill or torture the pig really bothers me.

    (From Janie: no Linda, they do not “torture” the pigs. And like the American Indians who used to thank the buffalo they killed for sustenance, thyroid patients thank the pig for allowing us to live again. )

    Reply
  61. Syl

    I have two questions, I am taking 50 MCG Levothroid since 10 years, but I’d like to switch for Naturethroid. What would be a dosage?

    The other question is the Iodine Plus 2 is a same good as the Naturethroid?

    http://1-thyroid.com/hormones.html

    “You see, there are two types of iodine necessary for optimal nutrition and thyroid function: Iodine and iodide. The iodine supplements you normally find are made from kelp – a seaweed – lacking in iodide. Plus, the iodine supplements you’ll see on the retail shelves are about 100 times too weak to be effective in stimulating your thyroid and reversing hypothyroidism! 

Low iodine equals low thyroid. Low thyroid equals low energy, and a busload of other symptoms. 

It’s that straightforward. ”

    (From Janie: this is more for comments than questions. Go here for feedback: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/talk-to-others )

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  62. Cali

    I have been on Armour thyroid for about 5 years now. I am on 1 grain a day. I have tried to up my dose but would have palpitations and feel an uncomfortable nervousness. And recent tests have shown my cortisol levels have dropped back down. They have never been high. I read the book “Adrenal Fatigue” over a year ago but my attempts to recover from adrenal fatigue have failed, so I was just given Adrenal concentrate(bovine) 440mg. a day. Do you think this is the right stuff to be on? And if this doesn’t help I guess I will ask my Dr. about HC. My question is, will I not be able to raise my Thyroid meds for as long as it takes to recover my adrenals? Which I understand could take up to a year or more? My hypothyroid symptoms have returned and I am feeling defeated after feeling better for a few years. The constant monitoring and fluctuation of my hormones is exhausting. Please help with any advice you can. Thank you,
    Cali

    (Cali, go here: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/talk-to-others You’ll see ways to get feedback from patients)

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